Organizational Readiness

Measurement Guide and Checklist Example

A form that can be used as a starting point for assessment and evaluation of technology supports.

Alternative Overnight Supervision

Alternate Overnight Supervision

A proven way to increase both independence and privacy of the person served, this newer monitoring practice is called Alternate Overnight Supervision and can be utilized following a formal assessment of the individual and once informed consent has been given by the person served. Along with obtaining an AOST (Alternate Overnight Supervision Technology) License, defined policies and procedures must be in place.

Measuring for Success

With newly implemented technology support strategies, it is important to measure the success, not only for persons-served and staff, but the financial success as well. To get a full look at the impact technology supports have had on an organization, providers should consider several key factors when assessing the financial output and associated benefits of the plan in place to determine cost effectiveness.

How do the numbers add up?

Do the Numbers

When deciding to implement a new support strategy it is important to run a cost analysis to fully plan out the business case for your organization. A sample cost analysis has been created below that can be used to help analyze anticipated costs and revenue when going from on-site sleep to alternative overnight supervision.

Creating a strong base

The Phoenix Residence made the decision to invest heavily in new technology when they transitioned from paper records to electronic processing. Their new technology investments not only freed up resources to assist in handling some workforce issues that are common in the disability services industry, but also had the added benefit of allowing their residents to utilize assistive technology devices powered through Wi-Fi to increase independence.

From Legislative Sessions to Conference Sessions

Upcoming Conference sessions on technology at the ARRM Annual Conference

Utilizing technology to not only provide opportunities for greater independence, but to also assist with the declining workforce is not necessarily a new topic, but it is one that has made it to the top of many individuals lists due to recently passed legislation in Minnesota.

With a Little Help from Your Friends

Technology sounds like a great addition to care plans. You’ve heard it can help increase independence for individuals with disabilities, and assist with staff management and how staff do their jobs. But where do you start? How do you turn conversations into actionable strategies? How do you find the specific technology supports that will work for the individual?

The Basics

Gaining organizational buy-in for change can be difficult, but it doesn’t need to be. We’ve broken down our most recent training webinar into a three-part post series where three experts who have gone through the technology implementation process share how they helped bring and spread the use of technology supports within their own organizations. In part one of the series, The Basics, experts cover the basic steps needed to bring forward technology supports as a valid option for your organization and the individuals you help support based on their experiences.

 

Breaking Barriers

You believe in the power of technology and the benefits it creates for everyday living—for everyone. Now how do you share and spread your enthusiasm with others in your organization? How do you get co-workers, family members, and self-advocates on board with adding technology supports into existing care plans to increase independence and privacy? In part two of our three-part post series on creating organizational buy-in, three experts walk you through what they did within their own organizations to break down common barriers and gain buy-in from all members of the care team.

Basic Home Network Security: What You Need to Know

Assistive technologies like voice-generated searches, hover recognition, and refreshable braille displays have made notable strides in recent years, and significantly contributed to promoting independence for those living with physical or cognitive disabilities—all the more reason, then, to make sure your home network is adequately protected. Keeping assistive technology secure is a positive step towards reinforcing independence and privacy.

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