Monitoring Technology

Care Profile

A form developed by Sengistix to track important contacts, technology information, and actions plans. Blank form and example provided.

DHS Monitoring Technology Policy

This policy applies to both new and existing monitoring technology equipment and supervision funded under one of the following home and community-based services (HCBS) programs.

Monitoring Technology: Informed Consent and Individual Privacy

Monitoring Technology: Informed Consent and Individual Privacy When utilizing monitoring technology, the issues surrounding informed consent and individual privacy must be accounted for. Informed consent must be obtained for all individuals affected by the proposed monitoring technology as people have a right to know what is being used in their environment and what information may be captured.

Alternative Overnight Supervision

Alternate Overnight Supervision

A proven way to increase both independence and privacy of the person served, this newer monitoring practice is called Alternate Overnight Supervision and can be utilized following a formal assessment of the individual and once informed consent has been given by the person served. Along with obtaining an AOST (Alternate Overnight Supervision Technology) License, defined policies and procedures must be in place.

The Business of Independence

A New Way of Doing Business

As people served were expressing a stronger desire to be more independent, Dungarvin staff thought through scenarios on how to navigate both the independence desire and how they would provide services in the future. Technology was their answer.

How do the numbers add up?

Do the Numbers

When deciding to implement a new support strategy it is important to run a cost analysis to fully plan out the business case for your organization. A sample cost analysis has been created below that can be used to help analyze anticipated costs and revenue when going from on-site sleep to alternative overnight supervision.

Remote Supports : 10 common questions every family should ask

Remote support technology comes in many forms. From medication dispensers that remind individuals to take their medication (and alert staff if access hasn’t occurred) to more high-tech options such as remote monitoring where external staff monitor a series of sensors and/or video  to alert internal staff to a need, options exist to help increase an individual’s privacy and independence while maintaining their needed level of care.

From Legislative Sessions to Conference Sessions

Upcoming Conference sessions on technology at the ARRM Annual Conference

Utilizing technology to not only provide opportunities for greater independence, but to also assist with the declining workforce is not necessarily a new topic, but it is one that has made it to the top of many individuals lists due to recently passed legislation in Minnesota.

Regaining Confidence Through Remote Support

A 159 hour per week drop in caregiver hours seems dramatic. That’s because it is—but in a good way. Ryan Sebelius was able to achieve greater independence while decreasing his need for in-person support through the use of remote support technology. Though not “traditionally” supported 24 hours a day as he was before the addition of technology, he is certainly not without support during the times a caregiver isn’t physically present in his home.

Advocating for Technology Supports

Recently, we were able to sit down for an interview with Lauren Ireland to discuss technology and how it plays a role in her daily life. Lauren lives in Minneapolis, MN and her home is licensed for supportive community-based services. At 30 years old,  Lauren has had access to and has used technology all her life, though it wasn’t until she moved into her current home nearly 10 years ago that she became aware of remote monitoring technology and the benefits it provided her and other individuals with disabilities.

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